Telling History

Our culture studies history through written text primarily, but there are more holistic ways to learn from the past. Material culture studies offer a style of learning history that focuses on the everyday objects people from the past used. Examining mundane objects...

Why History?

After reading Claudia’s Blog Post 7 on Google search engines, I thought about my own response to the question: “Why do you Google?” I use Google to get the quickest answer, and I see Google as an unbiased search engine. I did not even realize that search engines are...

Crafting History

Every story is a history lesson. Some stories are nonfiction and they tell about people, things, places, events, and movements. Other stories are fictitious, but still teach a lesson of some sort about the same kind of subjects; for instance, folk tales teach commonly...

Telling History

https://www.thestoryoftexas.com/la-belle/the-exhibit/artifacts The ability to write history using material objects depends on what evidence has survived. For example, we may not have the flesh of animals which were consumed as food, but we may be able to determine...
Blog Post #8: Telling History

Blog Post #8: Telling History

History’s Silences One of the things we learn from doing the work of object analysis is how incomplete our historical record–material and documentary–actually often is. We realize how the narrative histories we’ve received in our textbooks, and...
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